Ying Yang Xue

"If something is cold, heat it. If something is hot, cool it." –Huangdi Neijing

Archive for the tag “parmesan”

PEACH CONGEE FOR LIVER QI STAGNATION!!!

What do you get when you have student who works in the prepared foods section at Whole Foods… an awesome yummy snack! Well, that’s exactly what EH brought to us last Wednesday for our Nutrition and Diet Therapy class at the East West College of Natural Medicine. EH’s congee was an absolute treat after VS’s hearty and tasty main course of Saffron Lentil rice with Chicken (see next post). We ate like royalty today thanks to VS and EH!!!

Peach Congee for Liver Qi Stagnation

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Ingredients: 1 cup white rice (any variety will do)

1-2 peaches (or half bag of frozen chopped peaches)

1 Tablespoon honey (or as much as desired)

Directions: Put one cup of rice in crock pot. Cover with 5 cups of water. Cook on low setting overnight (6-12 hours). If using fresh peaches, boil a small pot of water, and once water is boiling, place peach into water for 30 seconds with a pair of tongs. Remove peach and peel off skin. Chop peaches into bite sized pieces, and keep in refrigerator overnight. In the morning, when ready to eat, put chopped peaches into the congee, and add honey. Add small amount of butter if desired.

This dish is ideal as a daily breakfast, dessert, or snack. The recipe can be doubled or tripled to make a large pot that can last for 3-4 days. I chose this simple and inexpensive recipe because it consists of ingredients that we are all familiar with, and it is as easy to prepare as pouring a bowl of cereal (but much more nourishing!). Those with liver qi stagnation are often already overworked and will not be compliant with following complicated dietary guidelines.

Rice is sweet in nature, and is very nourishing, especially when cooked into a congee. Peaches are sweet and sour, and are a gentle mover of qi. While the more pungent foods may move qi more forcefully, they run the risk of damaging yin when overused. Liver qi stagnation is often accompanied by heat signs, so peaches are a safer route when looking for a dish that can be eaten daily. (Also, most people don’t want pungent foods at breakfast!) Honey is neutral to slightly warming, and also moistens the intestines, which can be beneficial if constipation is manifesting as a side effect of qi stagnation. All of these ingredients also strengthen the spleen and are very easy to digest, which is important in cases of liver qi stagnation because digestion is usually impaired due to this condition.

Note: Blackstrap molasses can be used in place of honey in cases of accompanying blood deficiency, or if your tatsebuds prefer it!

TCM DOS:  Liver Qi Stagnation

Western Correlations:  Stress, emotional disorders, depression, PMS

TCM S/S:  hypochondriac pain, distention in chest and hypochondria, sighing, hiccups, belching, depression, irritability, easy to anger, nausea, vomiting, epigastric pain, abdominal distention, diarrhea, poor appetite, sour regurgitation, plum pit sensation in throat, painful periods, irregular periods

Tongue:   normal to slightly red on sides

Pulse:  wiry

Foods that Help:  beets, carrots, celery, potato, tomato, onion, lemon/lime, spinach, cherry, pineapple, mulberry, plum, raspberry, wheat, rye, spelt, pine nut, lima bean, pea, black sesame seed, pork, saltwater fish, crab, cow milk cheese, yogurt, goat and sheep milk cheese, anise seed, brown sugar, rice vinegar, wine, grape, lychee fruit

Foods to Avoid:  avoid excess alcohol, hot/spicy foods, raw foods, greasy foods, and cold/frozen foods

Helpful Cooking Methods:  steaming, boiling for shorter period, blanching, and cooking with alcohol


Smooooooooth Your Liver Qi!!!!!

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Welcome to Ri-Frin’s LR Qi Sir-Fry Bar!! Here you in charge. No angry, irritable, or frustration over long wait, small portions, or just not what you want.

LR Qi stagnation was chosen for me, and like everyone else’s DOS “choice”, mine was a perfect fit. (Thank you, Dr. Wald) Sources say that it is best to eat foods that are lightly cooked to ensure that nutrients are preserved and are more readily digested and absorbed. Meals should consist of lightly cooked vegetables (roughly 40-60% of your diet) About 30% of the diet should be comprised of complex carbohydrates. Proteins should comprise only about 10% of the diet and red meat should be avoided.

I have designed a meal where every single ingredient is a benefit to anyone who is challenged by LR Qi stagnation. Take as much or as little you like and I will personally prepare your dish before your very eyes! This is not a selfless act, however. Taking the time to prepare the ingredients before the meal and then later stirring the contents around in the wok (or electric skillet) so as to not let them burn and insure an even cooking temperature is a great way to get out of one ’s self for a spell and just concentrate on the task at hand…  A sort of meditation if you will.

Ingredients:

 

extra virgin olive oil (EVOO) garlic paste

boneless-skinless chicken cutlets ginger paste

center-cut pork tenderloins green onions

asparagus baby bok choy

carrots cabbage

leeks horseradish

noodles shitake mushrooms

snow peas soy sauce

water chestnuts white rice

 


TCM DOS:  Liver Qi Stagnation

Western Correlations:  Stress, emotional disorders, depression, PMS

TCM S/S:  hypochondriac pain, distention in chest and hypochondria, sighing, hiccups, belching, depression, irritability, easy to anger, nausea, vomiting, epigastric pain, abdominal distention, diarrhea, poor appetite, sour regurgitation, plum pit sensation in throat, painful periods, irregular periods

Tongue:   normal to slightly red on sides

Pulse:  wiry

Foods that Help:  beets, carrots, celery, potato, tomato, onion, lemon/lime, spinach, cherry, pineapple, mulberry, plum, raspberry, wheat, rye, spelt, pine nut, lima bean, pea, black sesame seed, pork, saltwater fish, crab, cow milk cheese, yogurt, goat and sheep milk cheese, anise seed, brown sugar, rice vinegar, wine, grape, lychee fruit

Foods to Avoid:  avoid excess alcohol, hot/spicy foods, raw foods, greasy foods, and cold/frozen foods

Helpful Cooking Methods:  steaming, boiling for shorter period, blanching, and cooking with alcohol


 

Comfort food to calm the Liver

This week was all about soothing the liver to overcome liver qi stagnation–timely, since we had our midterm exam during the first half of this class!  TB went the “comfort food” route for her dish; after all, when you’re stressed and at your wit’s end, what else do you want to reach for but comfort food?  She expertly created a stick-to-your-ribs hearty soup that still had the properties of calming the liver and moving qi.   This tomato soup went over resoundingly well.  I honestly expected a riot over who got seconds; had our livers not been so soothed by the soup, it may have actually come to pass!

TCM DOS:  Liver Qi Stagnation

Western Correlations:  Stress, emotional disorders, depression, PMS

TCM S/S:  hypochondriac pain, distention in chest and hypochondria, sighing, hiccups, belching, depression, irritability, easy to anger, nausea, vomiting, epigastric pain, abdominal distention, diarrhea, poor appetite, sour regurgitation, plum pit sensation in throat, painful periods, irregular periods

Tongue:   normal to slightly red on sides

Pulse:  wiry

Foods that Help:  beets, carrots, celery, potato, tomato, onion, lemon/lime, spinach, cherry, pineapple, mulberry, plum, raspberry, wheat, rye, spelt, pine nut, lima bean, pea, black sesame seed, pork, saltwater fish, crab, cow milk cheese, yogurt, goat and sheep milk cheese, anise seed, brown sugar, rice vinegar, wine, grape, lychee fruit

Foods to Avoid:  avoid excess alcohol, hot/spicy foods, raw foods, greasy foods, and cold/frozen foods

Helpful Cooking Methods:  steaming, boiling for shorter period, blanching, and cooking with alcohol


Tomato Parmesan Soup

3 cups diced tomatoes with juice (you can use canned)

1 bunch kale

1 cup finely diced carrots

1 Tbsp fresh oregano or 1 tsp dried

4 cups chicken broth

1 cup parmesan cheese, freshly grated

1/4 tsp black pepper

2 Tbsp olive oil

1 cup finely diced onions

4 Tbsp fresh basil or 1 Tbsp dried

1/2 bay leaf

2 cups half and half, warmed (if you want you can use whole milk, evaporated milk instead…or even skim if you want to skinny it up; I ended using 1/2 cup of half and half in this recipe)

1 tsp salt

*1/2 cup butter

*1/2 cup flour

1.  Heat oil in 4 quart soup pot.  Add onions and carrots.  Saute 5 minutes.  Add basil, oregano, bay leaf, tomatoes, and chicken broth.  Bring it to a boil, reduce heat and simmer until carrots are tender (25 minutes).

2.  Place soup in blender or use hand-held to liquefy and thicken soup.  *(Or you can prepare a roux to thicken it.  While soup simmers, prepare a roux.  Melt butter over low heat, add flour and cook, stirring constantly, 5-7 minutes.  Slowly stir in 1 cup hot soup.  Add another 3 cups and stir until smooth.  Add back into soup pot.)

3.  Simmer, stirring constantly..  Add Parmesan cheese and whisk to blend.  Stir warmed half and half, salt and pepper.  Simmer over low heat 20 minutes, stirring occasionally.

For Liver Qi Stagnation:

-tomatoes:  clears heat in liver and purifies blood

-onion:  soothes liver Qi stagnation

-carrot:  improves liver function

-kale:  superfood

-parmesan:  supplements and moves Qi

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